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Posts tagged ‘Facebook’

Digital trends for luxury brands

In order to maximize sales online, an increasing number of luxury brands are taking a bespoke approach, offering personalized services as well as products exclusively sold online. A research presented by Enora Consulting.

Luxury e-commerce now represents 4-6% of the 200 billion euros in sales of luxury goods in the world, according to different estimates compiled by Enora. Almost nonexistent ten years ago, it grew by 25% per year over three or four years and could remain progression of 20% per annum in the coming years.Today, “the number of brands (luxury) with no site is very low” and “brands are positioned more upscale, less use of the Internet is advanced,” says Enora which points to the fact that a third of luxury online sales in France, today, are made with outlet stocks.

luxury brands

Product customization is one of the most widespread approach on e-commerce by many of the major luxury brands: Louis Vuitton offers personalized online of luggage with ”my monogram”,Ralph Lauren offers customization of their shirts (choice of logo, color, adding initials), Boucheron, customizes rings (choice of stones, shapes, quotes by e-mail), Longchamp is selling on-line a range of bespoke bags made of canvas, while Gucci offers customization of leather goods with the initials of the buyer in gold instead of 2G pattern as well as a collection of sneakers exclusively available for online sale on the Ipad. (more…)

Growth of the countries on Facebook

Facebook is still number one social media channel in the world. Why ? Take a look at the graphic.

In 2012, the growth is moving from West to East as Asia gradually makes it´s way to the continent with the biggest Facebook population.

(more…)

Burson-Marsteller’s Social Media Check-Up study

Businesses from the Global Fortune 100 are mentioned 10.4 million times a month on social media, mostly on Twitter, according to Burson-Marsteller’s third-annual Social Media Check-Up

This is one of the reasons why Twitter is the most popular social network among these companies, with 82 percent having a Twitter account. And the vast majority aren’t just broadcasting messages—they’re engaging with consumers: 79 percent of corporate accounts attempt to engage on Twitter with retweets and mentions.

YouTube, which is the next most-popular platform, have branded YouTube channels with a percentage of 79%. These YouTube channels average more than 2 million views and about 1,600 subscribers.

Nearly three-quarters of the companies have Facebook pages. The average number of “likes” per page is 152,646. And 93 percent of the Facebook pages are updated weekly. 70 percent of corporate Facebook pages are responding to comments on their walls and timelines.
Meanwhile, 48 percent of the Global Fortune 100 have a Google+ presence, while 25 percent are active on Pinterest. (more…)

[Infographic] Shopping behavior in Asia and Australia through Facebook

According to Social Bakers, Facebook in Asia and Australia represents 25% of World. Out of the 901 million Facebook users, 240 million (27%) monthly active users (MAU) live in Asia and Australia. Whilst India and Indonesia lead in terms of the user numbers the fastest growing country by far is South Korea, which grew its user base by an incredible 94% on Facebook from July 2011! Socialbakers study shows that the majority of Asia-Pacific Facebook users love to shop online. (more…)

KLM Airlines passengers can pick their seatmate using Facebook

KLM Airlines is giving passengers the power to pick who they sit next to via social media. The opt-in system will display the Facebook and LinkedIn profile pages of each passenger on the flight.

Source: Mashable

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PR Pret-a-Porter.

Heinz and “Get Well Soon” messages

I know that is winter and also December and we just have only  a few days out of 2011, but still, when it comes to colds, the viruses don’t know anything about holidays, Christmas or New Year’s Eve. This is the reason why Heinz launched this online campaign. Loveable, in my opinion.

Heinz used Facebook to enable fans to send a personalized tin of soup to friends suffering with a cold.

alttext

Personalized foodstuffs may be nothing new, and we recently saw Maynards in Canada engaging fans via Facebook with the chance to win candy shaped in their own image. A different take on the idea recently sawHeinz in the UK using Facebook as a platform for fans to send personalized tins of soup to friends suffering with a cold.

Heinz partnered with We Are Social in order to increase social media presence and sales, which resulted in a timely and relevant seasonal campaign acting as an alternative to a “Get Well Soon” card. Throughout October, after becoming a fan of the Heinz UK Facebook page, users could customize a can of Cream of Tomato or Chicken soup with the name of a sick friend or loved one, to be be delivered within three to four days. The service was only available in the UK, and cost GBP 1.99 per personalized can.

The campaign reportedly created a considerably amount activity on Twitter, further proof that consumers engage in ideas that allow them to personalize and share. Plenty for inspiration here!

Website: www.facebook.com/HeinzSoupUK

Source: SpringWise

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Facebook and Political Messages

Even politics went to Facebook. Who’s next ?

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Facebook timeline designs

If you have a social media addiction, you are working in social media industry or you’re just creative, take a look at the pictures below.

 

Source: Mashable

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Facebook promotion: Olla Condoms

oana vasiliu

Probably the most creative online campaign of this year. Thanks Webcultura for sharing it with us.

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The History of Advertising on Facebook

Source: Mashable.com

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Facebook infographic

Source: Mashable.com

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Social Networking

“Facebook did not invent social networking” says Vishal Sikka, SAP executive board member for technology and innovation.

But who did it ?

To prove his point, Sikka cited a case from 235 years ago when Thomas Paine, as part of America’s battle for independence, wrote his “Common Sense” manifesto.

“At the time,” Sikka said in his keynote speech at the TechEd Las Vegas event, “there were 1.5 million colonists, and out of that 1.5 million, 900,000 got a copy of Paine’s ‘Common Sense’ manifesto.

“Imagine: 900,000 people out of 1.5 million! So with all due respect, you know—of course we are all heavy users of Facebook and Twitter and so on—but social computing was not invented by Facebook; it happened a long, long time ago.”

The engine behind Paine’s first-generation social network—and even those not fond of Paine’s work must admit that reaching 60% of the total universe is pretty good penetration, particularly via a first-gen approach—was the printing press rather than today’s great connector of Facebook, Sikka contended.

“Johannes Guttenberg invented the printer to make it easier for people, originally, to print Bibles,” Sikka said early in a keynote talk entitled ‘A Simplifying Renewal.’

“And really what ended up happening with the invention of printing was that it became possible for people to become empowered to articulate their own thoughts in precise ways and  typographers were not at liberty to change what people had written, and so you had control of your own destiny.

“So people think about this and you wonder: connectedness is not something that just happened recently. People today talk a lot about connectivity, but connectedness has been going on for a long time.”

The core message behind Sikka’s commingling of Facebook, the ‘Common Sense’ manifesto, and Guttenberg’s printing press is that the age-old concept of content being the prisoner of the container in which it is held is unraveling today—and that software in particular will benefit enormously from the acclerated separation of content from container.

The results include more power to individual users, more specificity and beauty in applications, and fewer layers of low-value containers getting in the way of and ensnaring the high-value content.

In SAP’s case, the modern-day Guttenberg printing press is the HANA in-memory technology that is becoming the platform and foundation for all of the company’s future products. Here’s how Sikka laid out the strategy:

“And closer to our own home, we have been seeing some unmistakable signs of this: today we see the enterprise landscape littered with systems, capabilities and services in software that are trapped inside hardware containers, and within other types of software containers, and in services of all different sorts. Transactional systems, data warehouses, data marts, etc.

“The former CEO of one of our customers once told me something similar to this idea of the factory inside the 3D printer. She told me, ‘Vishal, the only reason I have a warehouse’—she was not talking about a data warehouse, she was talking about a physical warehouse—‘is because I don’t have real-time information on what my suppliers have. If I had real-time information on my suppliers that I could make decisions on, then I don’t need this warehouse.’

“So we are seeing the first signs of this already. In the case of Hana, for instance, data marts are already disappearing: many of our customers have already turned off their traditional data marts and replaced them with Hana. We are seeing increasingly signs of data warehouses being replaced with HANA.”

Then Sikka offered his most expansive vision for SAP and HANA, proclaiming that “we intend to replace and unify the entire data-processing layer in all of our applications.” And put the emphasis on all.

“From HANA Analytics, to planning, to new transactional applications, to traditional applications—everything,” Sikka said, “And it is not that we are replacing all the litter that was there with more litter, or with a different kind of litter; we believe that a grand unification of all these layers is possible. That, in fact, we have the ability to separate the capabilities that are in our software, from the scaling and delivering of those capabilities.

“And we can separate these layers, and one single, modern infrastructure is capable of delivering the entire essential content: whether it is the traditional content that you have painstakingly built over the last 20 years, or new content that you want to build. It can all be served off the same infrastructure. And the entirely new infrastructure actually can be delivered in the way that you choose,” he added, with options for traditional approaches, or the cloud, or both.

“This unifying software, we believe, can be delivered on the next generation of modern hardware built out of commodity—high-end, but commodity—x86 processors, large amounts of memory, massively multicore processing, delivered either in integrated appliances built by the community of the best appliance builders, or delivered as an app in the enterprise cloud that you manage, that you scale up and down, no matter how many applications run in that infrastructure, no matter what kinds of workloads run in that infrastructure, whether it is one user doing a single query that is distributed to thousands of cores, or a thousand applications with millions of users running on those cores,” Sikka said.

“All the way from small to medium to large, the entire provisioning of the infrastructure can be done on the inside of an enterprise cloud. We have been working with many of our customers on this already, and, of course, delivering these new capabilities—mobility, in-memory computing—in our own cloud.”

It was social networking before Facebook. I’m convinced now.

Source: Forbes.com

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PR Pret-a-Porter.

Social media: limit or limitless ?

As company, do you need one Facebook account connected with one Twitter account or you need more? Maybe two, three, four ? How much is too much asks David Rogers in Bnet.

What’s his answer?

By now, most businesses know they should have a presence on Facebook or Twitter. But the more digitally-savvy businesses often ask, How many? Should you have only one Facebook page? Or multiple ones?

While some brands, like JetBlue, are represented by a single corporate Facebook page and a single Twitter account, other brands, like Dell, seem to sprout new Twitter accounts and Facebook pages every day, one for every department or division. Does this make them more efficient? When is it too much–or too little?

Unfortunately, there isn’t a simple one-size-fits-all answer. The best approach depends on your business, customers, brands and overall media strategy.

When One Voice Is Best

The benefits of a single, unified presence on a given social media platform are clear. A single account makes it easier to build a sizable audience. It may help focus your social media efforts (especially if you are a small or medium-sized business). It will provide a clear presence for your brand, and will avoid confusion among your customers about where to go to find you online.

When You May Want to Manage Multiple Accounts

However, there are many cases why multiple voices may be more effective for achieving a business’ social media goals.

Following are 7 reasons why a business may do better with multiple accounts:

1. Different Business Units. Many larger companies are structured around distinct business units that serve customers with different needs. In these cases, it can be much more valuable to the customer to follow or connect with a social media presence that is specific to their own needs. Dell, for example, has separate Twitter or Facebook accounts for its enterprise (@dellenterprise), education (@dellEDU), and small business (@dellSMBnews) operating units. That way each account can provide content and interaction that is more relevant to the right customers. SimilarlyGE has separate accounts for GE capital, water, aviation, appliances, and lighting. And at Columbia University, where I teach, there are separate accounts for the Schools of Journalism, Law, and Business.

2. Different Geography & Languages. Businesses operating in different countries may find a need for distinct social media accounts, especially to suit different languages of customers there. Dell has separate Facebook pages for India, Thailand, and Malaysia, among others. The Johnnie Walker spirits brand has a single master Facebook page that links to 32 international Facebook pages, allowing for content that is customized and in the local language: Mexico (Spanish), Brasil (Portuguese), Israel (Hebrew), and others.

3. Different Content Topics. Media companies and other idea-focused businesses that are producing a great deal of content for their customers may want to set up different social media accounts around different topics, so that customers can select those which are most relevant to them. The New York Timesruns numerous Twitter and Facebook accounts that spotlight the content of its various sections: Politics, Science, Travel, Food, Music, or even the Crossword Puzzle. Similarly, a university may set up separate accounts focused on atheletics, arts events, career placement, or even specific events or conferences.

4. Different Local Branches. Some businesses that have a brick-and-mortar retail presence may benefit from separate social media accounts for local branches. Whole Foods combines an overall corporate presence in social media with numerous accounts for individual branches (from Detroit and Chicago, to my hometown market in Montclair, NJ). This allows customers to get localized information about events, store news, and special deals happening at their own branch.

5. Different Social Media Strategies. Separate accounts can also be valuable when a business is trying to use the same social media platform for different strategic aims. Comcast uses one Twitter account as a customer service channel, and another one to share information on its community investment program. GE’s @GEreports provides news on technical innovations to its investor community, whereas accounts like @GEresearchjobs focus on hiring. Dell has run a very successful standalone Twitter account focused on sales of discounted inventory, @delloutlet.

6. Unique Voices within the Company. For companies with social media-savvy employees, and a great many customers seeking to interact online, it is sometimes beneficial to add personal corporate accounts in social media. These are accounts that are named by the company, but identified by a particular employee (from Zappos’s CEO Tony Hsieh, to customer service specialist @ComcastBill).

7. Unique Sub-Brands with Strong Personalities. If a company’s product brands, or sub-brands, have a strong enough personality of their own, customers may be more interested in connecting with them in social media, than with the corporate master brand. (Would you sooner “like” the Dove brand, or its parent Unilever corp?) Chevrolet has its own accounts on Twitter and Facebook, but also maintains accounts for Chevy Trucks, Chevy Camaro, Corvette, and the new all-electric Chevy Volt. The typical customer for Chevy Trucks and the Volt are likely quite different.

Making Sense to Your Customer

In essence, the decision of one or many voices within social media comes down to an understanding of your brand architecture (are you seen as one company? Or a collection of exciting brands?), and of your customer base (is it relatively homogeneous? Or do you have distinct networks of customers, which don’t overlap very much?).

If you do have good reason to establish separate social media accounts, and the resources to support them, make sure you keep them clear for your customer. The goal should be to avoid confusion, while allowing for more relevant and meaningful interactions with customers that build long term relationships and add value to your business.

 

Better tomorrow,

PR Pret-a-Porter.

Crisis management: Toyota case

Today I found an interesting case study about crisis management: Toyota. Mashable is presenting the facts and the story of Toyota via social media:

In January 2010, Toyota faced a nightmare situation for any brand, but particularly for one that staked its reputation on safety and quality: The company had to recall 2.3 million vehicles because of faulty accelerator pedals.

Suddenly, Toyota was trending on Google and Twitter on a daily basis, but for all the wrong reasons. Auto brands had faced similar crises before — Audi in particular grappled with a gas accelerator recall in the 1980s — but none had done so under the 24/7 scrutiny of social media.

But Kimberley Gardiner, Toyota’s national digital marketing and social media manager, saw an opportunity as well.

“Right away, we were seeing a lot of conversation and getting a lot of people who were using social media to reach out to us,” she says. “We didn’t have a lot of answers at the beginning.”

Toyota’s social media team, which was only a few months old at the time, decided to address the situation head on, but in a novel way: via Digg.

Before Digg’s disastrous Version 4 hit in August 2010, the site had a lot more social media influence. Recall that in 2009, Digg’s traffic ranged from 37 million to 44 million unique visitors each month. Plus, the site had outsize influence on Google News searches. At the time, it seemed like the best place for Toyota to get its message across.

On February 8, Toyota served up Jim Lentz, president of Toyota’s North American sales operation, to the masses in the form of a Digg Dialogg. In many ways, the appearance was a stroke of genius. For one thing, Lentz didn’t actually appear on Digg, but on a dedicated video site. The questions, which were voted on by fans (the ones with the most votes rose to the top) also wound up being pretty softball. “They were mostly general questions, like ‘What kind of car does Mr. Lentz drive?’” says Florence Drakton, social media manager. (“That’s a great question,” a clearly relieved Lentz answers.) Lentz’s interview, which ran 28 minutes, is still available on YouTube:

It was hard to beat the reach Toyota got from the appearance. Within a week, the Dialogg had received 1.2 million views. “Probably the biggest indicator of interest was there were 3,200 questions,” says Drakton. “Only celebrities have gotten that much.” In addition to reaching a fairly big audience, the Dialogg gave Toyota theappearance of achieving social media branding nirvana: Transparency. Though there were other factors at play, like news fatigue, researcher YouGov’s BrandIndex, which polls 5,000 Internet users daily, saw a bottoming out around the time of the Dialogg. Note: YouGov’s scores are based on consumers’ perception of the brand. A positive is +100 and negative is -100.

The best news for Toyota, though, is the company’s brand perception among those in the market for a car within the next six months is high. In YouGov’s most recent survey, Toyota was second only to Honda among that audience; the brand had leapfrogged Ford sometime in August.

Looking back, Gardiner says although the Digg Dialoggs (there were two more in July and August of 2010) were successful, if the same thing happened today, she’d probably use a TweetChat on Twitter instead. In fact, the medium is a favorite of Toyota’s, which has held several such chats in the last few months. Facebook, Gardiner says, is a great way to reach out to Toyota owners, but Twitter addresses those consumers who might be skeptical about the brand.

The choice of the exact form of social media may be beside the point, though. Like Dell, which became a social media poster child after its Dell Hell debacle, Toyota’s recall situation forced the company to embrace social media. “Toyota is an organization that is not used to being on camera and in the spotlight,” Gardiner says. “It was new to many people in the organization. It’s not something you plan for. We’re learning as we go.”

Better tomorrow,

PR Pret-a-Porter.

 

What about @irene ?

Everyone knows about Irene. No, it is not a beautiful lady, it is just another hurricane which stroke America. And, of course, Irene is social media friendly, as most of us nowadays. What is really impressing is the fact that not only the hurricane itself posts news and updates, but also authorities and news agencies.  

Twitter hashtags #irene and #hurricane kept everyone on the Eastern Seaboard informed over the weekend on the storm’s movement and the damage it left in its wake. Throughout Sunday, when the storm marched through New York and New Jersey, #Irene tweets came in nearly every second. 

News stations used #irene to pour out news updates and hurricane coverage scheduling. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie tweeted Sunday to stay indoors, also offering links to news conferences. 

As the storm hit New York City, Mayor Mayor Micheal Bloomberg offered some edicts, and words of encouragement, via Twitter: 

Sunday, 4 a.m.: RT @NYCMayorsOffice: We are in the midst of the most dangerous period of the storm, so for your safety, continue to remain indoors. #Irene

Saturday, 11 p.m.: Please stay where you are until the storm is over. Look out for one another. We will update you tomorrow morning. #Irene

Saturday, 11 p.m.: It doesn’t matter if you’re in a shelter tonight, or in your home, or staying with friends or family. We’re all in this together. #Irene  

A Facebook community page called Hurricane Irene was established on Aug. 21, when Irene was officially given a name. At the time it was a tropical storm. Leading into Monday morning, the page had grown to 20,000 “likes” and featured hundreds of comments, videos and photos. The Facebook Hurricane Irene “interest” page logged nearly 100,000 “likes.” 

One company, Clean Pro Restoration, used the forum to solicit business — ‎”…….FLOODED??? WATER DAMAGE?? STORM DAMAGE? CALL TODAY” — drawing an immediate backlash from the page’s contributors. The comment was removed. The company’s anemic website offers no information about where the company is located or who runs it. 

Social media also served as an outlet for some to complain about nonstop media coverage of the storm. One New Jersey Facebook poster said:

“Is it wrong to opine that if Hurricane Irene doesn’t level the Statue of Liberty, kill me and allow my wife to cash her $1 million life insurance lotto ticket, or turn Princeton New Jersey into Tripoli, it’ll all be a letdown for the masses minions and television anchors and reporters?” 

Another Tweet said: “Hurricane Irene is Category 1. CNN hype is Category 4.” 

Source: PR Daily.

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