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Archive for the ‘Public Relations’ Category

Bob Pickard: PR in Asia

After ten years in Asia, Bob Pickard gives precious information about public relations in Asia. via

1.  Communication should start with humble listening, not boastful talking

Especially at a time when communication is becoming more and more about conversation on social networks, succeeding in this new Asian age demands listening and thinking with an open mind attuned to modern Asian sensibilities, not just talking and bulldozing ahead with traditional Western approaches.

2.  What works in America or Europe doesn’t necessarily work in Asia

It’s a common sense point, isn’t it? But time after time, I see public relations effectiveness in Asia needlessly compromised by presuming that the way PR is done in New York or London will be effective in Tokyo or Hong Kong. Whether it’s how media relations is conducted or the way that communities form on social networks or even how people use language to communicate, the Asian experience can be markedly different than Western ways.

3.  Asia is not a country

Indeed, as far as PR campaigns are concerned, there really is no such thing as a market called ‘Asia.’ It’s amazing to me the cookie-cutter assumptions I sometimes encounter about doing PR here; as if what works in China will work in India even though within each, there is an incredible degree of demographic, cultural, and linguistic variation.

4.  Asian PR merits serious investment

Communicating with such diverse constituencies can command considerable PR resources, because operating in multiple languages takes much more staff time, which costs more money. When you consider the economic pressures of rising salary expectations in countries where the GDP is growing (not to mention high inflation levels in many markets), then higher prices than one has historically expected of Asia can be anticipated.

Stereotypes should not set PR budgets; Asian PR can already seem expensive compared to what many have assumed in the past. I’ve seen no shortage of situations where someone thinks that if PR costs a certain level in the West, then it should surely cost much less in the East, where ‘there’s much more cheap labour to go around.’ The problem is, in many Asian countries, PR is a relatively new or emerging field of endeavour, meaning that there’s a large demand for a much smaller supply of experienced PR people, driving prices up. Then there’s the expectation that all PR staff must be fluently bilingual in an international firm, in markets where often huge majorities of the population do not speak English, meaning all the recruitment demand fishes in a tiny bilingual talent pond that further steepens the cost spiral.

5.  Quality is the thing

There is a lot of restless multinational PR money roaming around Asia, switching from one agency to the next, fed-up with mediocrity and looking for certainty of positive outcome across borders. In some Asian markets, there are few or not enough post-secondary institutions offering PR education, so the smart firms are taking matters into their own hands and building their own training capability. Education must be at the heart of building a premium PR brand in Asia. As especially friends in North Asia will remember, setting the PR standard for quality is my #1 priority. I often remind myself of what one of my Korean clients once told me: “Aim for the money, and quality suffers; aim for the quality, and the money will always come.”

6.  English fluency is no guarantee of success

In many Asian PR offices, the best writer in the language that matters in the market may not communicate in English so well. When I ran offices in Seoul and Tokyo, some of our best media relations people couldn’t speak much English but the clients sure loved the publicity results. English fluency is no guarantee of a great strategic mind, and there can be these apple-polishing bilingual poseurs who manage overseas audiences well in the language of convenience for head office.

7.  Forget the cultural condescension

Partly because English is a second language in Asia (meaning many PR people may not be so keen to challenge and engage in fast-moving debate in English at meetings and on conference calls), there is still this widespread sense that Western PR is somehow superior to or more advanced than Asian PR, but in my experience that’s not objectively valid nor relevant in most circumstances. I don’t know how many times I’ve seen loquacious foreigners come to Asia with the attitude that the Asian PR people are a relatively ignorant audience whereas they are like oracles. A more peer-to-peer approach always earns the most goodwill. Let’s also note that Asia is now teaching PR lessons of its own, as we see with the worldwide rise of ‘apology communications.’

8.  Asian PR citizens of the world

A few years ago when I was running the Korean operation of another agency, I attended one of its meetings in Washington, DC when I made what I regarded as a statement of the obvious: “The global PR firm that attracts and champions the Asian talent will be the PR firm that wins in Asia.” I was challenged on that point by someone there, and was told that “the Asians look to the expatriate for leadership.” It was ironic to hear that kind of outdated talk, because my Korean successor was sitting in the room with me, and I think a key reason our office was the fastest-growing at that time in our company was the fact that the Korean staff knew he would be taking over after my two-year term and felt highly motivated by that eventuality (he and they went on to grow the business bigger than it was during my tenure).

There have been some stories lately about how because of ailing Western economies, job-seekers are heading East to Asia looking for opportunities. I don’t doubt it, but actually there have always been plenty of people heading to Asia; in the PR world, the flow in the other direction has been more like a trickle.

The Asian going West in an international PR firm — more so than vice-versa in my experience — can face many obstacles: stereotypes about whether people from their country can do well in the target country, assumptions about their ‘quality level’ (see above), questions about their language capability, whether they will find ample client business to fund their relocation, how adaptable they will be to a new cultural context, etc.

The priority must be on achieving diversity, not conforming to be the same. That’s why cross-border transfers in our consultancy aren’t rare; they are routine – and sincere (i.e. not primarily designed to prevent people being poached by a rival firm).

9.  Asia as a global platform

For many years, the dominant trend in Asian PR for multinationals was the import of Western money, ideas and people into the region, but now we we’re starting to see significant export of all these things from Asia by all kinds of exciting emerging multinationals (who will become globally famous from Asia for the first time on a digital marketing platform).

Just about every other week we see major Western multinationals anchoring important international headquarters and global functions into Asian centres like Singapore, Hong Kong or Shanghai. Some PR firms are seizing this opportunity and putting global functions into the region – such as the leadership of our energy practice based in Beijing – but alas others still have the attitude that anything ‘worldwide’ must of course be based in a Western centre like New York or London.

10.  ‘Face’ is just as important as Facebook

Probably the most important perspective you gain by actually living in Asia over several years is an innate feeling for the all-important ‘face‘ dynamic. Time and again, I’ve seen Westerners make costly mistakes in Asian commercial situations because they just don’t get it. In my opinion, grasping and mastering ‘face communications’ is the most important thing to know about doing PR in Asia.

I can’t write any blog on this topic without mentioning the value of relationships, which I think tend to have a different and often a more durable dynamic in Asia. During an era when a world with a shrinking attention span is embracing the transactional ways of fast-moving cool ‘digital’ technology, there is a special significance to the warmth of  face-to-face ‘analogue’ relationships that stand the test of time.

Generally when doing business in Asia, I think the feeling is more ‘relationship first, contract second’ rather than ‘contract first, then relationship.’

Compared to what I knew working on the other side of the Pacific where needlessly aggressive and often angry e-mail communication is certainly not uncommon, here I find relatively friendly – if often spirited – face-to-face encounters are more the norm when it comes to solving disputes and finding common ground.

Better tomorrow,

PR Pret-a-Porter.

Sweden products in terms of communication

1.  Electrolux Vac from the Sea programme, which ranked fourth in our Creative Index, is an example that combines everything required of a modern public relations campaign: social understanding, channel neutrality, ideas big and small, and a focus on genuine behavioural change.

2. Jung Relations’ efforts for Absolut, meanwhile, which see powerful public relations thinking infuse the company’s product strategy, are similarly impressive.  Two that stand out are the Absolut Unique project, and the NoLabel campaign.

3. Another campaign that should not be overlooked is MSL’s Ariel Fashion Shoot, recently named one of our Global SABRE Award winners.

via

Better tomorrow,

PR Pret-a-Porter.

Image

Happy birthday, Edelman !

Coca-Cola: World’s Largest Stop-Motion Video With Post-It Notes

Coca-ColaFor the Coca-Cola Conference of Happiness’ Wall of Happiness, Italian artist Eduardo Zamarro was commissioned to create the world’s largest stop-motion video using only post-it notes. The 1 million post-it notes (roughly 27,000 for each mural) feature messages of happiness from people in European cities. The mural was put together by 20 students and artists to create 135 artworks in only 15 days. Locals passing by the mural were invited to scribble their own ideas and messages of happiness as part of the mural experience.

via PSFK

Better tomorrow,

PR Pret-a-Porter.

Tourism branding: Shrewsbury, UK

Have you ever heard of Shrewsbury, the small medieval town between Liverpool and Birmingham ?

shrewsbury campaign

Wikipedia description says that Shrewsbury is a historic market town with the town centre having a largely unaltered medieval street plan. The town features over 660 historic listed buildings, including several examples of timber framing from the 15th and 16th century. Shrewsbury Castle, a red sandstone castle fortification, and Shrewsbury Abbey, a former Benedictine monastery, were founded in 1074 and 1083 respectively, by the Norman Earl of ShrewsburyRoger de Montgomery. The town hosts one of the oldest and largest horticultural events in the country, Shrewsbury Flower Show, and is known for its floral displays, having won various awards since the turn of the 21st century, including Britain in Bloom in 2006. (more…)

Client engagement in UK – Vodafone campaign

vodafone campaign

You are in London. You take a cab. The iconic black cab of London. How about a charger for your mobile phone there ? Vodafone UK  moved up a gear in terms of the communications facilities: they provide 1,000 London cabs with mobile chargers. An additional benefit of having in-cab charging and connectivity is that the drivers themselves can use them to stay connected. (more…)

China and Korea about PR

Do you know how PR is changing in China and Korea ? Take a look at this 2 minutes video.  (more…)

What Don’t People Get about PR

In PR Daily I found this article about “What don’t people get about PR and Communications”. Everyone gets this question sooner or later, often or rarely. Because most of the people don’t know what PR means for a company. Take a look at this video. It’s great. (more…)

Do you know the evolution of PR ?

New PR definition

The Public Relations Society of America’s campaign to determine an updated definition of “public relations” is over. Following a public vote last month, the winner is:

“Public relations is a strategic communication process that builds mutually beneficial relationships between organizations and their publics.” (more…)

Crisis management: FedEx case

In December 2011, a video of a FedEx deliveryman throwing a customer’s monitor over their fence on YouTube received over 3,000,000 views within 48 hours. Rather than ignoring the scandal FedEx immediately responded in kind. In a blog post entitled ‘Absolutely, Positively, Unacceptable’ and accompanying video of their own, Fedex apologize and explain that the offending video is now being used within the company to show employees what not to do. (more…)

Lovingly by Bruce Willis

LR Health & Beauty Systems introduces the first global women’s fragrance from Hollywood star Bruce Willis onto the market. With his new perfume “Lovingly by Bruce Willis”, the actor is providing a glimpse, for the first time, into his private life: the perfume is a declaration of love to his wife Emma Heming-Willis. (more…)

Definitions of PR

I have already written here about the attempt PRSA to define public relations. It’s taken two months, but the Public Relations Society of America has revealed the final three definitions of “public relations.” One of them will become the definition. (more…)

David Ogilvy: How to Write

On September 7th of 1982, advertising legend David Ogilvy sent an internal memo to all employees of his advertising agency, Ogilvy & Mather. The memo was entitled “How to Write,” and consisted of the following list of advice.

(Source: The Unpublished David Ogilvy: A Selection of His Writings from the Files of His Partners; Image: David Ogilvy, via Ogilvy & Mather.)
(more…)

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